March 5-12, 2019
New York, NY

Book Fairs

The Manhattan Vintage Book, Ephemera & Fine Press Book Fair

The Manhattan Vintage Book, Ephemera & Fine Press Book Fair

“The Shadow Show,” will be held on Saturday, March 9, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Church of St. Vincent Ferrer, 869 Lexington Avenue at 66th Street—just across the street from the Armory. Appraisals by John Bruno and guest appraisers from 1-3 p.m. Admission: $15 for adults, $7 for youths aged 12-21, and free for those under 12 with paid adult. The Shadow Show will also feature the Fine Press Book Fair within the larger fair.

Courtesy of A Good Read.

New York Antiquarian Book Fair

New York Antiquarian Book Fair

Sponsored by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America and the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers, the NYABF opens with a preview Thursday evening, March 7, and runs through Sunday, March 10, at the Park Avenue Armory at 643 Park Ave. Over 200 American and international dealers will display an astonishing array of rare books, fine art, maps, manuscripts, and ephemera. “Discovery Day” appraisal event on Sunday, 1-3 p. m. Admission: $60 for preview pass, $45 run of show, $25 daily, $10 for students carrying a valid school ID.

Courtesy of Lux Mentis Booksellers.

The New York City Book & Ephemera Fair

The New York City Book & Ephemera Fair

In its fifth year, this Rare Book Week “Satellite fair” now includes the Brooklyn Artists’ Book Fair and will run two days: Saturday, March 9 from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., and Sunday, March 10 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. More than 100 exhibitors will showcase antiquarian books, manuscripts, and ephemera, book art, and works on paper. Located in the bright and roomy Sheraton Central Park/Times Square, 811 7th Avenue, with free round-trip shuttle bus service to the Armory available. Admission: $15 for adults, free for students with ID.

Courtesy of Chatham Bookseller.

Auctions

Bonhams

Bonhams

Several sales are on horizon at Bonhams during Rare Book Week. On March 11, the Medical and Scientific Library of W. Bruce Fye boasts all the big names in rare science books: a first edition of De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543) that is “one of the most important association copies in existence,” according to the auctioneer, is estimated at $300,000-500,000, and Benjamin Franklin’s seminal Experiments and Observations on Electricity, made at Philadelphia in America (1769) is estimated at $10,000-15,000. Then, on March 12, Bonhams will offer Extraordinary Books and Manuscripts, a sale that is slated to include a first edition of Adam Smith’s first book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) from the estate of Robert McNamara. Online shoppers will be interested to know that part seven of Eric Caren’s How History Unfolds on Paper will be ongoing from March 6-14, and part two of the W. Bruce Fye Library will be up March 12-21.

Courtesy of Bonhams.

Heritage Auctions

Heritage Auctions

The sale at Heritage on March 6 features 231 books from the collection of Otto Penzler, longtime proprietor of NYC’s Mysterious Bookshop and major collector of crime and mystery fiction (profiled by Nick Basbanes in our spring 2017 issue). The high points include two notorious rarities in the genre: a first edition of Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales (1845), bound in early twentieth-century half purple crushed morocco over double-marbled paper-covered boards and once owned by author and noted book collector Michael Sadleir, and a “superlative” first edition of Dashiell Hammett’s Red Harvest (1929), in the original, unrestored first-printing dust jacket, estimated at $60,000.

Courtesy of Heritage Auctions, HA.com.

Swann Galleries

Swann Galleries

Early in the week, on March 5, Swann Galleries will present a selection of nineteenth- and twentieth-century prints & drawings to tempt the collector’s eye. Then, on March 7, its annual Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books will enthrall. Highlights include a first edition of Frederick Ruysch’s Icon durae matris in concava [convexa] superficie visae, with two color mezzotints by Jan Ladmiral, printed in Amsterdam in 1737. Its estimate is $4,000-6,000. In manuscripts, a richly illuminated manuscript prayer book in Latin and French from the second quarter of the sixteenth century leads the way; its estimate is $20,000-30,000.

Courtesy of Swann Auction Galleries.

Exhibits & Events

Bard Graduate Center

Bard Graduate Center

Jan Tschichold and the New Typography: Graphic Design Between the World Wars is currently on exhibit at the Bard Graduate Center, 18 W. 86th St. in Manhattan. Curated by Paul Stirton, the exhibition explores the influence of typographer and graphic designer Jan Tschichold (1902-1974), who was instrumental in defining “The New Typography,” and presents an overview of the most innovative graphic design from the 1920s to the early 1930s. Items on display include El Lissitzky’s Pro dva kvadrata (1920), László Moholy-Nagy’s Staatliches Bauhaus Weimar (1923), and (pictured here) Tschichold’s Die Frau ohne Namen (The Woman Without a Name) poster (1927), printed by Gebrüder Obpacher AG, Munich.

Photolithograph: The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Peter Stone Poster Fund, 225.1978. Digital Image: © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY.

The Center for Book Arts

The Center for Book Arts

Located at 28 W. 27th St., 3rd floor, the Center for Book Arts hosts exhibitions and gallery events in addition to its usual full calendar of bookbinding and printing arts classes. During Rare Book Week and through March 30, see Politics of Place, an exhibition of artists’ books, mainly from Australia and North America—both new world territories that share parallel histories—that explores issues centered in enslavement and conflict-caused immigration. Also on exhibit: Dignidad, an art installation from the National Archive of Chile by the Chilean artist María Verónica San Martín based on secret telephone documents about Colonia Dignidad.

Doug Beube's Travel Ban. Courtesy of the Center for Books Arts.

The Grolier Club

The Grolier Club

The Grolier Club, located at 47 East 60th St., has undergone major renovation and is ready for its closeup! Stop by to see Alphabet Magic: Gudrun & Hermann Zapf and the World They Designed, a celebration of the couple’s contribution to calligraphy, type design, and bookbinding. The 170 pieces on display are drawn from the Zapf Archive at the Cary Graphic Arts Collection at Rochester Institute of Technology, headed by exhibition co-curator Steven Galbraith, and the private collection of book designer and fellow exhibition co-curator Jerry Kelly. Also on exhibit beginning March 5: A Matter of Size: Miniature Texts & Bindings, from the collection of Patricia J. Pistner, a selection of 275 tiny tomes.

Credit: Hermann Zapf alphabet. Courtesy of the Grolier Club.

Biblotourism

Chumley's

Chumley’s

86 Bedford Street
Manhattan

Drink After a decade-long hiatus, Chumley’s, the former Greenwich Village speakeasy of choice for many a poet and playwright, recently reopened. It’s a bit higher-end these days, but the book jacket decor is back.

Courtesy of the Chumley's.

Poe Cottage

3309 Bainbridge Avenue
The Bronx

Tour Edgar Allan Poe spent the last years of his life, from 1846-1849, in The Bronx. This landmark house museum is where he wrote “Annabel Lee” and “The Cask of Amontillado.” Open Th-Su.

Credit: Flickr.com Courtney "Coco" Mault.

Bowne & Co. Stationers and Bowne Printers

Bowne & Co. Stationers and Bowne Printers

209-211 Water Street
Manhattan

Shop Experience the traditional craft of nineteenth-century letterpress in a charmingly atmospheric shop true to its origins. Open every day 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Credit: Flickr.com Sang-hee.